filmidialogue:

Jessica Raine, as Jenny Lee, in Call the Midwife.
Anne Hathaway, anyone??

filmidialogue:

Jessica Raine, as Jenny Lee, in Call the Midwife.

Anne Hathaway, anyone??

barefootawareness:

High vibin eatsss

barefootawareness:

High vibin eatsss

katiohead:

…Happy National Midwifery Week…

Tuesday: Share Your Moment of TruthWhen was your moment of truth? Was it the first time you realized a midwife was right for you or the time you realized you wanted to become a midwife? All realizations related to women’s health care are welcomed.

I remember my awakening. I had my first baby with a family practice doc in the hospital and it went very smoothly because I labored at home and didn’t go to the hospital until the last minute. Even then, they still wanted to do things to me that seemed ridiculous at the time - I’m ready to push this baby out and you want to run a chem panel??!!
But that wasn’t really when I knew midwifery was the best way for me. I just knew that it seemed silly in retrospect to go to the hospital to push the baby out after laboring at home. When my baby was born I just wanted to be at home in my own bed with her - I wasn’t sick, there was no reason to keep me in the hospital - but they wouldn’t release me either. I didn’t have a ::bad:: hospital experience at all, in fact it was about as good as it gets, and it left me feeling empowered enough to do it at home the next time.
My eyes were opened wide several years later when I was a graduate student at the University of Oregon. As a graduate teaching fellow, I was able to take any classes I wanted to take without paying tuition, so I took courses out of my department for fun, for the sake of learning. One of those classes was a women’s studies weekend seminar on the Politics of Childbirth. The final component of the course was a panel that included midwives (licensed and unlicensed, CPM and CNM) and physicians (OB’s and perinatologists) and they all talked about what they do and how they do it. I knew then and there if I was ever going to have another baby it would be at home and with a midwife. 
Several years later, 2005, I was pregnant again. My insurance would only cover an OB and hospital birth, so we paid out of pocket for a midwife in Ohio (where it is neither legal nor illegal to practice midwifery) to attend the birth of our sweet Little1. …only to learn that I was breech at 39 weeks still and may not have a home birth at all! My midwife was still willing to attend a breech at home, but I was feeling sketched out by the idea of it (now I would ONLY have a breech at home with a skilled midwife, in case you were wondering - but when you know better, you do better, right?). A very midwife friendly obstetrician saw me though and did an external version that was successful and I continued on with my plans for a home birth and our daughter was born after a few hours of labor at home.
Fast forward several years more and my desire to become a midwife had grown to the point that I quit my job teaching Spanish and followed the path to midwifery and here we are.
Did you have a baby with a midwife? I’d love to know how you came to the decision.

katiohead:

…Happy National Midwifery Week…

Tuesday: Share Your Moment of Truth

When was your moment of truth? Was it the first time you realized a midwife was right for you or the time you realized you wanted to become a midwife? All realizations related to women’s health care are welcomed.

I remember my awakening. I had my first baby with a family practice doc in the hospital and it went very smoothly because I labored at home and didn’t go to the hospital until the last minute. Even then, they still wanted to do things to me that seemed ridiculous at the time - I’m ready to push this baby out and you want to run a chem panel??!!

But that wasn’t really when I knew midwifery was the best way for me. I just knew that it seemed silly in retrospect to go to the hospital to push the baby out after laboring at home. When my baby was born I just wanted to be at home in my own bed with her - I wasn’t sick, there was no reason to keep me in the hospital - but they wouldn’t release me either. I didn’t have a ::bad:: hospital experience at all, in fact it was about as good as it gets, and it left me feeling empowered enough to do it at home the next time.

My eyes were opened wide several years later when I was a graduate student at the University of Oregon. As a graduate teaching fellow, I was able to take any classes I wanted to take without paying tuition, so I took courses out of my department for fun, for the sake of learning. One of those classes was a women’s studies weekend seminar on the Politics of Childbirth. The final component of the course was a panel that included midwives (licensed and unlicensed, CPM and CNM) and physicians (OB’s and perinatologists) and they all talked about what they do and how they do it. I knew then and there if I was ever going to have another baby it would be at home and with a midwife. 

Several years later, 2005, I was pregnant again. My insurance would only cover an OB and hospital birth, so we paid out of pocket for a midwife in Ohio (where it is neither legal nor illegal to practice midwifery) to attend the birth of our sweet Little1. …only to learn that I was breech at 39 weeks still and may not have a home birth at all! My midwife was still willing to attend a breech at home, but I was feeling sketched out by the idea of it (now I would ONLY have a breech at home with a skilled midwife, in case you were wondering - but when you know better, you do better, right?). A very midwife friendly obstetrician saw me though and did an external version that was successful and I continued on with my plans for a home birth and our daughter was born after a few hours of labor at home.

Fast forward several years more and my desire to become a midwife had grown to the point that I quit my job teaching Spanish and followed the path to midwifery and here we are.

Did you have a baby with a midwife? I’d love to know how you came to the decision.

(Source: englishsnow)

impartart:

August Macke, Seated Female

impartart:

August Macke, Seated Female

(Source: omgitstriciac)

(Source: fluffynips)

blastedheath:

Charles Ginner (British, 1878-1952), Luppitt in Devon, 1924. Black ink and watercolour, 13½ x 10 in.

blastedheath:

Charles Ginner (British, 1878-1952), Luppitt in Devon, 1924. Black ink and watercolour, 13½ x 10 in.

my-british-blog:

The long road home by crafty1tutu (Ann)
Glenridding, Lake District, England

my-british-blog:

The long road home by crafty1tutu (Ann)

Glenridding, Lake District, England

(Source: smallfucks)

(Source: elkking)

dorkymando:

whyusosirius:

thesirjordan:

Julie Andrews on how she got the part in Mary Poppins.

WE’LL WAIT

when walt fucking disney waits for you then you are the absolute queen of everything

The absolute Goddess of the world

(Source: lejazzhot)

1000drawings:

Full Moon by Mike Schultz

1000drawings:

Full Moon by Mike Schultz